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Lux Render

Lux Render

As you probably know, there’s quite a lot of raytracers out there that have exporters for Blender. Some time ago I tested Yafaray as an alternative to the Blender internal raytracer. Results were pretty good, especially for architectural scenes this is a really good raytracer.

Recently I stumbled upon Lux Render, which claims to be a physically correct raytracing solution. It’s also open source so definitely worth checking out. The gallery on their homepage surely is impressive so it was time to test how its usability is for a hobbyist like me. Installation is straight forward (at least in Windows) and there’s a nice export script for Blender. One thing I immediately liked about Lux Render is the documentation. There’s a whole lot of it which is pretty up to date and gets you easily going. If you’re using Blender just check out the “First scene tutorial” and you’ll have a sweet render in no time.

Render results are good, but as always one needs to get used to the specific interpretation of light values and other stuff. There’s also another thing I found rather odd: when rendering there’s no progress bar or anything to give a hint about when the render is finished. Why is that? Short answer: the render is done when you think it’s done. Lux render iteratively renders images, improving the quality in each iteration. You can follow this progress in the render gui and in the first few iterations the improvments are quite noticable. After a while though there hardly seems to change anything. This is irritating first, but has the advantage that preview and final image only depend on how long the raytracer is allowed to render.

Here’s my first (and so far only) test with Lux render, way to go to the level of their gallery images :)

Simple lux render test

Posted in Raytracing Tagged , .

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